Knitting Olympics, pt. 2: Birch (cont'd)

Birch (Ravelled) is growing:I've long since lost track of what number repeat I'm on. What matters is that

a) The stitch-count is under 150 stitches per row (and falling,)
b) I've got the pattern memorized, and
c) I no longer fear Kidsilk anything.

At this point I only have one concern, which is simple and concise -- how the crap am I going to block this thing? Seriously, tips and advice would be appreciated muchly.

11 comments:

Heather G. said...

It took up our entire bed and a little bit more...

spillyjane said...

I figured as much...what I'm most concerned about is the actual soaking process. I would hate to have put all this time and effort into a shawl only to turn it into a giant felt-ball in the final lap.

I'm guessing that immersion is not the best option? What should I do, then? Press it? Steam it with my iron?

Heather G. said...

Ah heck, I would immerse it... just don't agitate. Lift it out of the water with a colander? Mash out as much water as possible with a towel, then lay it out and block it. But start early in the day, and consider a fan, or alternate sleeping arrangements ;)

Anonymous said...

Canadian Tire sells big squares with edges like puzzle pieces which fit together. I think the original purpose if to use for children to play on. I purchased two packages. The come 4 to a pack and are 2x2 feet each square. I used these to do the blocking of my Christmas gift projects. Worked well. You have to let them take them out of the plastic wrap and let them air for a couple of days as the label suggests. If you have the room to lay them on the floor, this might work for you. Good luck!

Ytknits

Winterhart said...

Immersion's totally fine, really; just as with a sweater, get it good and totally wet through, but don't swish it around.

Soak with wool wash (or whatever) for a half hour or so, then lift the whole sopping mess into a towel. Try not to let any of it hang down while you're lifting it, to avoid stretching it too much. Squeeze the towel gently to get as much extra water out. Then just spread it out on whatever surfaced is handy and pin as usual.

P.S. it really will fluff back up, I promise!

Winterhart said...

Also (and I apologize for the lousy phone-typing) I wouldn't press it. That will just flatten the halo down into a felt-looking mat and take the fluffy joy out of mohair!

Kelly said...

I'm pretty sure the kidsilk haze will withstand immersion. Thats the only way I like to block lace, otherwise you can't seem to get those holes to open up. It is lovely by the way.

kaila said...

you could use a bottle spray and spray it instead of dunking it into water?

Karen said...

I've always been a little scared of Kidsilk--how to treat it, I mean. It seems so delicate. Good ideas here!

Julie said...

it will wet block just fine, and it will dry really fast. I knitted a sweater out of kidsilk, and found that it was quick to dry- I pinned it out on my mattress (after rolling it in a towel to get most of the water out), and put it in a room with a fan. it was dry within 5 hours. Hope that helps!

Kelly said...

When I blocked mine it was so huge I had to do it out on my back deck. I had one of those very long styrofoam boards you get at Home Depot (cost about $6) and stretched and pinned the top portion across the foam. Underneath I had to spread a blanket and pin the bottom point through the wood of the deck. It was a blazing hot July day then, though, and it took about 2m to dry ;p

Here's a pic:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/70645272@N00/886113892/in/photostream/